reWrap

The Dutch accessory uses coconut fiber, natural rubber, and bees wax.

When your bag wears out, you could toss it in the trash for another tiny addition to the world’s bulging landfills. Or, with the “Tree Bag,” you could jam it with your banana peels and coffee grounds in the compost bin—it’ll break down over time, making worms and soil bacteria all the merrier.

The planet-friendly accessory is designed by Amsterdam’s reWrap, which is shipping products after running a successful Kickstarter campaign. Here are its features as described on Designboom:

the bag takes a no-compromise approach to style and functionality, and utilizes a unique, all-natural material palette to create a distinctive, sophisticated aesthetic. the ‘tree bag’ is made from fibers extracted from coconut husks. this is a by-product of conventional cultivation, which allows production without the use virgin elements.

fibers are pressed with natural rubber to form a light, sturdy, and naturally waterproof fabric. in its natural state, rubber is fully biodegradable, contrary to its industrial vulcanized variant. ‘tree bag’s’ clasp and handle are composed of durable walnut and everything is sewn with a wood pulp thread. in its entirety, the ‘tree bag’ doesn’t possess a single non-natural or toxic material, and can be safely composted at the end of its long life

The bag is water-resistant, in part due to a glossy coating of bees wax on the wooden components, and has been described by one purchaser as “kinda rubbery.” One caveat: If a fiber starts to unravel, cut it with a scissors, because if you pull it parts of the bag might come undone like an unruly ball of yarn.

“Tree Bag,” €275 ($302) for large, €245 (269) for medium

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