"SXY DRVR" will keep you warm all of next January. Shannon Kirkman

In a new calendar, New York cabbies show off their bods for your pleasure—and a good cause.

The world’s failure to adopt Moses Cotsworth’s 13-month calendar more than 70-years ago has perhaps deprived the human race of more efficient accounting and scheduling. More importantly, it has deprived us of one extra New York cab driver to ogle from our cubicle and bedroom walls every year.

The 2016 NYC Taxi Drivers Calendar ($14.99) is out, with a dozen of the city’s sexiest licensed drivers striking poses alongside their yellow cabs. Created by Philip and Shannon Kirkman, the calendar gives us the right mix of modest bodies and irresistible personalities. You’ll wish you were blowing bubbles with Mr. June or sharing a hot slice with Mr. September. Getting in the trunk with Mr. May, however, is not advised.

If you’re worried that such images may distract your coworkers or upset a significant other, remind them that a portion of the proceeds go to University Settlement, a New York non-profit that helps over 30,000 immigrants, workers, and families with education, housing, and literacy programs. According to the Kirkmans, their calendar sales from previous years have generated almost $50,000 for the agency so far.

Your move, Uber.

Mr. February
Mr. November
Mr. June
Mr. July

All photos by Shannon Kirkman.

Calendar, $14.99 at NYC Taxi Calendar.

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