Aldana Ferrer Garcia

A gigantic bay window for your tiny space.

“More Sky,” a project by Argentinian-born, Brooklyn-based industrial designer Aldana Ferrer Garcia, envisions a world in which mini city apartments are just a little bit bigger. No, no pop-up housing involved here: Ferrer Garcia’s concept involves “window niches” into which the cramped city dwellers can crawl for a broader peek at the sky.

The windows can fit into standard window settings, and are totally up to code in Ferrer Garcia’s home borough. The “awning niche” gives users a better perch from which to gaze out on the street; the “casement niche” provides panoramic views of the entire neighborhood; and the “hopper niche” invites users to lie down and enjoy an extended view of the sky.

“Awning niche” (Aldana Ferrer Garcia)
“Casement niche” (Aldana Ferrer Garcia)

“’More Sky’ is a cozy corner for the home that provides visual relief, access to sunlight. and fresh air for small apartments,” Ferrer Garcia writes of the project. It’s meant to respond “to current needs in densely populated cities,” she concludes.

“Hopper niche” (Aldana Ferrer Garcia)
The view from “hopper niche” (Aldana Ferrer Garcia)

Ferrer Garcia is currently seeking partners in manufacturing, engineering, and distribution, to help bring “More Sky” to market.

H/t Contemporist

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