Logideez

Logiplaces transform cities and natural landmarks into “playable landscapes.”

Get ready to ditch your Newton’s cradle—there’s a new player in the office toy market. The Budapest-based architecture studio Planbureau is set to launch “Logiplaces,” a series of concrete puzzles modeled after locations around the globe.

There are four Logiplaces in the first batch: the Grand Canyon, Zermatt resort in the Alps, Budapest, and San Francisco. But the company is inviting the public to pick the next location through an online poll. After reaching its Indiegogo goal of $15,000, the studio plans to release another model for every $5,000 of additional funding.

And if you have $1,750 lying around, they’ll make one custom for you. That’s the company’s long-term goal: producing puzzles for any location a customer could ask for.

A concrete map of downtown Budapest. (Logideez)

The concrete for these “playable landscapes” is poured, ground, and polished by hand, and the molds are 3D-printed using topographical data from ASTER and Open Street Map. Available in 16- and 36-piece sizes, the puzzle won’t be much of a brain teaser. But whether it’s strewn across a coffee table or assembled as a centerpiece, each Logiplace is a classy way to show your love for a specific city, skyline, or natural landmark.

Early backers can get the Grand Canyon and Zermat puzzles by December 2015. The rest of the sets ship in April 2016.

Logiplaces puzzle, $55+ pre-order on Indiegogo.

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