A new partnership between CityLab.com and Univision Digital.

I’ve got some exciting news to share with CityLab readers this morning. On Tuesday, The Atlantic is announcing a new partnership between CityLab.com and Univision Digital, the digital division of Univision Communications Inc., to launch a Spanish-language version of CityLab.

To be called CityLab Latino, the new destination will feature a mix of original journalism in Spanish as well as translated versions of CityLab.com stories. CityLab Latino will live at Univision.com, and is expected to launch in early 2016.

Since we first launched CityLab in 2011 (back then known as The Atlantic Cities), we’ve consistently heard from our Spanish-speaking readers that they want more coverage of the ideas and urban issues CityLab cares about—the environment, design, housing, culture, technology, crime, immigration, and more—both in Spanish and centered around the growing global cities where Spanish is spoken. By partnering with Univision.com, by far the dominant Spanish-language digital platform in the U.S., we’ll be able to do just that.

You can read more about our plans for the project here. The first step will be to hire a Miami-based Spanish-language editor to run CityLab Latino. The job listing for that role is here.

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