Treated.com

A healthy alternative to waiting for the train.

One way to avoid both train delays and slow death by work desk is to walk everywhere. In New York, that’s fairly easy to do—and it’s good for you, too, as shown in this map of calories burned by walking between subway stations.

The map was created by U.K. healthcare company Treated.com. (Earlier this year, Treated.com also made one for the London Tube.) Just add up the numbers to calculate calories burned for an entire journey. In the chart below, you can see how walking stacks up against jogging and biking on a few common trips.

Results will vary, of course—Treated.com based its calorie counts on a 179-pound person walking at a speed of 3 miles an hour. But in any case, these numbers show how easy it is to squeeze some valuable exercise into your commute.

H/t Gothamist

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    A New Plan to Correct a Historic Mistake in Pittsburgh

    A Bjarke Ingels Group-led plan from 2015 has given way to a more “practical” design for the Lower Hill District. Concerns over true affordable housing remain.

  2. Electricians install solar panels on a roof for Arizona Public Service company in Goodyear, Arizona.
    Environment

    A Bottom-Line Case for the Green New Deal: The Jobs Pay More

    A Brookings report finds that jobs in the clean energy, efficiency, and environmental sectors offer higher salaries than the U.S. average.

  3. A photo of shoppers on University Avenue in East Palo Alto, California, which is flanked by two technology campuses.
    Equity

    An Island of Silicon Valley Affordability Says Yes to More Housing

    East Palo Alto is surrounded by tech riches, but that hasn’t necessarily helped longtime residents, who welcome a state law mandating zoning reform

  4. A photo of a closed street in St. Louis
    Equity

    What’s Behind the Blocked Streets of St. Louis?

    Thanks to an '80s mania for traffic calming, the St. Louis grid is broken by hundreds of car barriers and cul-de-sacs. Critics say it’s time to get rid of them.

  5. A new map of neighborhood change in U.S. metros shows where displacement is the main problem, and where economic decline persists.
    Equity

    From Gentrification to Decline: How Neighborhoods Really Change

    A new report and accompanying map finds extreme gentrification in a few cities, but the dominant trend—particularly in the suburbs—is the concentration of low-income population.