Treated.com

A healthy alternative to waiting for the train.

One way to avoid both train delays and slow death by work desk is to walk everywhere. In New York, that’s fairly easy to do—and it’s good for you, too, as shown in this map of calories burned by walking between subway stations.

The map was created by U.K. healthcare company Treated.com. (Earlier this year, Treated.com also made one for the London Tube.) Just add up the numbers to calculate calories burned for an entire journey. In the chart below, you can see how walking stacks up against jogging and biking on a few common trips.

Results will vary, of course—Treated.com based its calorie counts on a 179-pound person walking at a speed of 3 miles an hour. But in any case, these numbers show how easy it is to squeeze some valuable exercise into your commute.

H/t Gothamist

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