Manuel Rosell

Hang with your bike off the road, too.

Where the heck is is the city cyclist supposed to store her bike in her small apartment? A new concept by the Chilean designer Manuel Rosell and the company Chol1 offers a deceptively simple answer: Why, in your furniture, of course.

The company’s 2016 catalog shows off eight functional sofas, chairs, benches, and desks, all with specialized slots for a sleek urban bicycle. It’s up to you to keep your bike clean enough for the indoors.

“Angulo” (Manuel Rosell)
“Arrimo” (Manuel Rosell)
“Banca” (Manuel Rosell)
“Basico” (Manuel Rosell)
“Buffet” (Manuel Rosell)
“Escritorio” (Manuel Rosell)
“Sillon” (Manuel Rosell)
“Zen” (Manuel Rosell)

Furniture, $49 to $445 at Facebook.

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