Their stomachs must be lined with titanium.

Some people want to cross bridges; others like to climb so high on them it would give an osprey a case of cookie-tossing vertigo.

Turkish “rooftoppers” Pavel Smirnov and Özcan İpar are the second sort of fellows, as they proved recently with a woozy scramble up the unfinished Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge. This megastructure stretches more than 7,000 feet across the Bosporus and reaches heights of roughly 1,050 feet—a distance not extreme enough for the climbers, as they then mounted a construction crane and went even higher.

The most challenging aspect of the journey was not not splattering their atoms to the four corners of the world but … the weather. “Really It was a hard this climb because 300 Meter and near a ocean,” Smirnov writes on YouTube. Things “were very cold.”

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