Their stomachs must be lined with titanium.

Some people want to cross bridges; others like to climb so high on them it would give an osprey a case of cookie-tossing vertigo.

Turkish “rooftoppers” Pavel Smirnov and Özcan İpar are the second sort of fellows, as they proved recently with a woozy scramble up the unfinished Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge. This megastructure stretches more than 7,000 feet across the Bosporus and reaches heights of roughly 1,050 feet—a distance not extreme enough for the climbers, as they then mounted a construction crane and went even higher.

The most challenging aspect of the journey was not not splattering their atoms to the four corners of the world but … the weather. “Really It was a hard this climb because 300 Meter and near a ocean,” Smirnov writes on YouTube. Things “were very cold.”

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a rendering of the moon village with a view of Earth
    Design

    Designing the First Full-Time Human Habitat on the Moon

    SOM, in partnership with the ESA and MIT, wants to accommodate research and maybe even tourism on the moon.

  2. Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California
    Life

    America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

    Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.

  3. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  4. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  5. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.