America's national GDP grew 2.3 percent in 2014, but not every city fared equally well.

America’s GDP grew 2.3 percent in 2014, according to a recent Bureau of Economic Analysis report. But each metro contributed differently, and a new map by cost-info website howmuch.net takes a look at each city’s relative impact.

The map represents 2014 GDP growth for U.S. metros as green cones of varying height. The taller and darker green the cone, the more that city’s economy grew last year. Flat, red metros saw negative percent change in GDP growth: the redder these areas, the worse their economic conditions.

While the New York metropolitan area posted the highest GDP in the country, at $1.5 trillion, it only grew by 2.4 percent. The Dallas metro, meanwhile, showed the most relative growth among the 10 most populous U.S. metros: 8.5 percent.

Among the 381 metros analyzed by the BEA, the two metros with the most year-over-year growth were also in Texas. Midland saw a 24 percent GDP growth in 2014. San Angelo ranked second with an 11 percent increase.

Midland’s prosperity comes from tapping into its long untouched oil reserves. As then-Mayor Wes Perry told Governing in 2013, fracking “was the game changer.” But economic growth comes with problems. The rents in the city have become prohibitively high, a situation that’s worsening inequality in the region. Here’s a tweet from a Midland resident in 2014:

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    With Trains Like Schwebebahn, No Wonder Germans Love Public Transit

    Infrastructure like this makes it clear why Germany continues to produce enthusiasm for public transit, generation after generation.

  2. Amazon HQ2

    Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

    The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

  3. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  4. Life

    The Town Where Retirees Can’t Retire

    In fast-aging pockets of rural America, older residents are going back to work. But not always because they need the money.

  5. Equity

    The FBI's Forgotten War on Black-Owned Bookstores

    At the height of the Black Power movement, the Bureau focused on the unlikeliest of public enemies: black independent booksellers.