Celebrate your love for heavy-rail commuter systems by putting every single one of them on your wall.

Who knew that all the world’s subways, when packed next to each other in one graphic, bear a striking resemblance to a colony of squished daddy longlegs?

Entomological unease aside, this poster of the planet’s 140 metros should make a fantastic holiday gift for the city-obsessed nerd. Made by Neil Freeman, an artist and urban planner who runs the site Fake Is the New Real, the roughly 29 by 23-inch, black-and-white sheet stacks train systems with the largest ones at top…

...and the most basic at bottom:

Here’s an early version of the whole thing. Freeman tweets that the final product will “look something like this, barring unforeseen system extensions”:

Neil Freeman

In case you’re wondering why your city’s dinky metro isn’t represented—I’m looking at you, Seattle Link—Freeman is focusing on “high capacity, grade-separated heavy rail” systems, not so much light rail.

Poster, $20 at Fake Is the New Real.

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