Blue Crow Media

Navigate your way around one of the world’s best collections of Heroic concrete with this new guide.

Few cities have as many great examples of Brutalist architecture as London. Now, you can find them on a single map.

Derek Lamberton of Blue Crow Media has teamed up with Henrietta Billings of the Twentieth Century Society to launch a series of London architecture maps for different architectural styles. Brutalist London Map is their first release.

Blue Crow Media

Eager to rebuild after World War II, London constructed dozens of civic buildings and housing projects across the city all the way into the 1970s. Thanks to the popularity and affordability of concrete at the time, many fit the classification of Brutalism, coined by Alison and Peter Smithson—two of London’s most radical mid-century architects—and made popular by architecture theorist and Courtauld Institute of Art graduate, Reyner Banham.

Blue Crow Media

One side of the foldable 16.5-by-23.5-inch map shows the locations of more than 50 concrete buildings around London, including the Trellick Tower, the Barbican, and the Balfron Tower. On the other side, there’s Billings’s summary of the architectural period, accompanied by descriptions and stunning photography of the buildings listed.

Some of these buildings—including the Smithsons’ Robin Hood Gardens, a residential example of the much-maligned style—won’t be around much longer. So take your London Brutalism pilgrimage soon and don’t forget your map!

Brutalist London Map, $12.02 at Blue Crow Media.

Blue Crow Media

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