Block by block, piece together the iconic skylines of New York City, Berlin, and Venice.

Courtesy of Lego

Someone at Lego must have been looking through CityLab’s wishlist. The toy company, which already produces replicas of iconic buildings like the Louvre and the White House, has finally given city skylines the Lego treatment.

As part of its latest “Skylines” collection in the Architecture series, you can now recreate three cities—Berlin, New York, and Venice—out of the classic blocks. The sets, which will be available January 1 for $30-$60, includes a handful of each city’s most famous landmarks. The replica of New York City’s skyline, for example, features the Statue of Liberty—with clear pieces to represent the Hudson River—the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, the Flatiron Building, and One World Trade Center.

Courtesy of Lego

Representing Venice are the Rialto Bridge, St. Mark’s Basilica, St. Marks Campanile, and the Bridge of Sighs. To top it all off, Lego also threw in the city’s ancient Winged Lion of St. Mark.

Courtesy of Lego

Perhaps the most intricate of the three is the replica of Berlin, with specially created pieces to capture the rounded architecture of Deutsche Bahn tower and the Berlin TV tower. The set also includes the Berlin Wall, the Reichstage building, and the Brandenburg Gate. A gold figurine stands in the place of the Victory Column.

Courtesy of Lego

“All of the sets feature iconic buildings and landmarks which we hope appeal to not only people that live in those cities, but fans who have visited or wish to visit those places one day,” Amanda Santoro, Lego’s brand relations manager, says in an email.

Each kit includes a booklet on the architectural history of each landmark so you’re learning as you’re building.

Of course, with hundreds of museums, statues, and skyscrapers among the three cities, the sets hardly capture the breadth of it all. But then again, with more pieces and a bit of creativity, there’s no reason why you can’t add to the NYC skyline by building your own Rockefeller Center or Woolworth Building.

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