Hypnos

This garment addresses two chief annoyances of travel: being cold and tired.

If you need any more evidence of society’s apprehension over travel insomnia, have a look at Hypnos, a sweatshirt that’s blasted almost $300,000 past its Kickstarter goal all because it inflates into a pillow.

“The Hypnos Hoodie is a beautiful, comfortable, and practical hoodie designed for creatives, travelers, commuters and anybody who has a moment to take a rest,” reads the pitch for the sweatshirt, which is designed by L.A.’s Josh Woodle. “It’s more than a hoodie, it’s your day-to-day (and day-to-night) essential comfort garment, and it does things other hoodies can’t [like blowing up] to form a perfectly ergonomic pillow for rest on the go.”

Considering its inflation mechanism is similar to those on commercial-airplane flotation devices, it could also (maybe, but probably not) save your life in the deep ocean. But let’s focus on its primary function. Say you’re taking a red-eye and don’t want to haul around a neck pillow. Breathe into the Hypnos’s tube and the hoodie engorges, transforming into a padded, scalp-enveloping snooze-surface that only slightly makes you look hydrocephalic (though the designers claim the swelling is “inconspicuous”).

Today’s the last day for the sweatshirt’s Kickstarter, with a few premium preorders left for a March delivery. Otherwise, perpetually weary travelers should keep an eye on the Hypnos website, where it will likely retail for around $60.

Hypnos, $150+ on Kickstarter

Hypnos

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