OOMS

A Dutch design studio fabricated really graphic greenery out of aluminum.

The humble pothos doesn’t get a lot of love. Despite some efforts to make it hip, the plant is still often associated with depressing, dusty waiting rooms—the kind with outdated upholstery and synth-riddled smooth jazz.

It’s pretty hardy, though. The horticultural writer Mary Kate Hogan waxed rhapsodic about it in her book, 37 Houseplants Even You Can’t Kill:

Also known as devil’s ivy, this vinelike plant with glossy, heart-shaped leaves is almost oblivious to abuse. Ignore it. Neglect it. And this cheerful plant will keep right on growing.

The pothos is pretty foolproof, even under your office’s fluorescent lights. But the most congenial of plants sometimes still struggle in the winter, when drafts and radiators cause soil to dry out and leaves to wilt.

Even though it’s pretty tough to straight-up murder a pothos, it’s even harder to slaughter one made of metal, unless you’re wielding a saw or blowtorch—which, hopefully, you’re not keeping at your desk.

(OOMS)

The Dutch design studio OOMS recently produced a series of sleek, powder-coated aluminum silhouettes of three common houseplants, including the pothos. Secured to a beechwood base, they stand about two feet tall—sprawling enough to double as a privacy screen if you want to keep your neighboring desk jockey out of your business.

The €202.48 price tag is definitely steep, especially when you can get the real deal for less than $5 at a bodega. This one sidesteps the problem of untangling root balls and repotting in a conference room—and the spindly vines trailing down your desk, creeping towards your co-worker’s coffee mug. And it looks really modern, too.

Steel plant sculptures, €202.48 at OOMS.

H/t Inhabitat

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