OOMS

A Dutch design studio fabricated really graphic greenery out of aluminum.

The humble pothos doesn’t get a lot of love. Despite some efforts to make it hip, the plant is still often associated with depressing, dusty waiting rooms—the kind with outdated upholstery and synth-riddled smooth jazz.

It’s pretty hardy, though. The horticultural writer Mary Kate Hogan waxed rhapsodic about it in her book, 37 Houseplants Even You Can’t Kill:

Also known as devil’s ivy, this vinelike plant with glossy, heart-shaped leaves is almost oblivious to abuse. Ignore it. Neglect it. And this cheerful plant will keep right on growing.

The pothos is pretty foolproof, even under your office’s fluorescent lights. But the most congenial of plants sometimes still struggle in the winter, when drafts and radiators cause soil to dry out and leaves to wilt.

Even though it’s pretty tough to straight-up murder a pothos, it’s even harder to slaughter one made of metal, unless you’re wielding a saw or blowtorch—which, hopefully, you’re not keeping at your desk.

(OOMS)

The Dutch design studio OOMS recently produced a series of sleek, powder-coated aluminum silhouettes of three common houseplants, including the pothos. Secured to a beechwood base, they stand about two feet tall—sprawling enough to double as a privacy screen if you want to keep your neighboring desk jockey out of your business.

The €202.48 price tag is definitely steep, especially when you can get the real deal for less than $5 at a bodega. This one sidesteps the problem of untangling root balls and repotting in a conference room—and the spindly vines trailing down your desk, creeping towards your co-worker’s coffee mug. And it looks really modern, too.

Steel plant sculptures, €202.48 at OOMS.

H/t Inhabitat

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: South Korean soldiers attempt to disinfect the sidewalks of Seoul's Gagnam district in response to the spread of COVID-19.
    Coronavirus

    Pandemics Are Also an Urban Planning Problem

    Will COVID-19 change how cities are designed? Michele Acuto of the Connected Cities Lab talks about density, urbanization and pandemic preparation.  

  2. Equity

    We'll Need To Reopen Our Cities. But Not Without Making Changes First.

    We must prepare for a protracted battle with coronavirus. But there are changes we can make now to prepare locked-down cities for what’s next.

  3. Equity

    The Last Daycares Standing

    In places where most child cares and schools have closed, in-home family daycares that remain open aren’t seeing the demand  — or the support — they expected.

  4. photo: a bicycle rider wearing a mask in London
    Coronavirus

    In a Global Health Emergency, the Bicycle Shines

    As the coronavirus crisis forces changes in transportation, some cities are building bike lanes and protecting cycling shops. Here’s why that makes sense.

  5. An African healthcare worker takes her time washing her hands due to a virus outbreak/.
    Coronavirus

    Why You Should Stop Joking That Black People Are Immune to Coronavirus

    There’s a fatal history behind the claim that African Americans are more resistant to diseases like Covid-19 or yellow fever.

×