Show-offs.

Need some highway bridges moved, and quick? Then contact the construction whizzes behind this extraordinary job in Zhengzhou, which saw twin spans this Saturday rotated 90 degrees in 88 minutes.

The footage comes from the People’s Daily, the Communist Party's official newspaper, so it’s hard to vet. But time stamps and the pace of people walking on the site seem to bear out that it took roughly 1.5 hours. No word yet on why the bridges needed to be turned—maybe Chinese engineers just like tackling impossible-sounding projects, considering they’ve also built a 1,640-foot pontoon span in 15 minutes and an airstrip in the middle of the dang sea.

H/t Shanghaiist

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