Ola Shekhtman

Global landmarks meet gorgeous accessories.

If you like it, you should put a ring on it. Or so the logic goes. Goldsmith Ola Shekhtman is upping the ante with her love of cities: she’s making them into rings.

The Siberian-born jewelry designer reimagined 12 major metropolises—including London, New York, Paris, Stockholm, and Hong Kong—as intricate accessories you can wear around your finger (perhaps to match your skyline bracelet).

London, in ring form (Ola Shekhtman)

While studying to be a goldsmith in St. Petersburg just four years ago, Shekhtman came up with the idea of creating a ring featuring a cozy house for herself. At the time, she was making everything by hand—“melting metal, rolling, sawing, soldering, polishing,” she writes on Etsy. She eventually crafted the house ring—and started to aim a little bigger.

Hong Kong (Ola Shekhtman)
Washington, D.C. (Ola Shekhtman)

Shekhtman and her husband moved to New York in 2013, and she enrolled in 3-D modeling courses. From there, her dream of creating cityscape rings got a lot more realistic.

Paris to go. (Ola Shekhtman)

Paris was her test case. When her design—complete with a mini Eiffel Tower, Moulin Rouge, and Arc de Triomphe—caused a sensation on her Etsy shop, Shekhtwoman, she expanded across the globe, and has no plans of stopping. She tells Huffington Post that this year, she has a list of more than 50 cities she hopes to “build.”

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