Matthew Stevenson

Metroid, Final Fantasy, and Zelda, all mapped out like your neighborhood metro.

If you wish you’d never let your parents give away your old Nintendo NES, fret not.

A series of maps just completed by D.C.-based graphic designer Matthew Stevenson can help ease (or maybe intensify?) your nostalgia. Inspired by his love of Nintendo, Stevenson re-drew six of his favorite video game universes as real-world subway maps.

The game Metroid, re-drawn above as the Washington, D.C. Metro.

All of the maps, which range from sprawling and intricate to simple and blocky, are based on large metropolitan subway systems. Stevenson started with the 1987 game Metroid, mashing it up with his familiar neighborhood subway system in Washington, D. C.

The idea to put the two together came to him organically.

“I was looking at all these cool Nintendo maps online one day,” he says. “And my first thought was, ‘how can I simplify these maps to do something like a T-shirt design?’ But it was just too complex. And the more I drew, the more it started looking like a subway map. And I just thought, ‘I love that.’”

After the Metroid map, Stevenson went on to make Maniac Mansion with Moscow’s metro, Final Fantasy with New York City’s MTA map, Dragon Warrior with Lisbon, The Legend of Zelda with London, and Zelda II with Tokyo.

The Legend of Zelda, re-drawn above as London’s Tube.

Map prints, from $13.50 at Red Bubble.

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