Matthew Stevenson

Metroid, Final Fantasy, and Zelda, all mapped out like your neighborhood metro.

If you wish you’d never let your parents give away your old Nintendo NES, fret not.

A series of maps just completed by D.C.-based graphic designer Matthew Stevenson can help ease (or maybe intensify?) your nostalgia. Inspired by his love of Nintendo, Stevenson re-drew six of his favorite video game universes as real-world subway maps.

The game Metroid, re-drawn above as the Washington, D.C. Metro.

All of the maps, which range from sprawling and intricate to simple and blocky, are based on large metropolitan subway systems. Stevenson started with the 1987 game Metroid, mashing it up with his familiar neighborhood subway system in Washington, D. C.

The idea to put the two together came to him organically.

“I was looking at all these cool Nintendo maps online one day,” he says. “And my first thought was, ‘how can I simplify these maps to do something like a T-shirt design?’ But it was just too complex. And the more I drew, the more it started looking like a subway map. And I just thought, ‘I love that.’”

After the Metroid map, Stevenson went on to make Maniac Mansion with Moscow’s metro, Final Fantasy with New York City’s MTA map, Dragon Warrior with Lisbon, The Legend of Zelda with London, and Zelda II with Tokyo.

The Legend of Zelda, re-drawn above as London’s Tube.

Map prints, from $13.50 at Red Bubble.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: subway in NYC
    Transportation

    Inside Bloomberg's $1 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

    Drawing on his time as New York City mayor, Michael Bloomberg proposes handing power and money to urban leaders as part of his Democratic presidential bid.

  2. photo: Developer James Rouse visiting Harborplace in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
    Life

    What Happened to Baltimore’s Harborplace?

    The pioneering festival marketplace was among the most trendsetting urban attractions of the last 40 years. Now it’s looking for a new place in a changed city.

  3. Transportation

    In Paris, a Very Progressive Agenda Is Going Mainstream

    Boosted by big sustainability wins, Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pitching bold plans to make the city center “100 percent bicycle” and turn office space into housing.

  4. photo: a couple tries out a mattress in a store.
    Equity

    What’s the Future of the ‘Sleep Economy’?

    As bed-in-a-box startup Casper files for an IPO, the buzzy mattress seller is betting that the next big thing in sleep is brick-and-mortar retail outlets.

  5. Equity

    Why Can’t We Close the Racial Wealth Gap?

    A new study says that income inequality, not historic factors, feeds the present-day gulf in wealth between white and black households.

×