microscape

Play King Kong from your desk.

Have you ever dreamed of being the King Kong of your metropolis, bounding from skyscraper to apartment buildings to historic district? Yeah? You’re the perfect candidate for Microscapes.

These hyper-detailed, 1:5000 scale models of the metropolis of your choice are printed in 3-D from non-toxic white plastic. (The creators, the firms TO+WN DESIGN and AJSNY, insist you can even eat off them, though who wants to pick quinoa from the weensy spaces between buildings?)

(Microscape)

The creators say they use completely up-to-date data to print their models, so each 6-inch, “half-mile” square tile can include buildings still under construction. The company also offers “landmark” tiles, which feature cities’ most notable sites.

(Microscape)

Microscapes’s first printing is only of Manhattan, but the company says it intends to print cities all over the country and world. For a cool $25,000, you can currently purchase all of New York City in mini, plastic form. Why buy a New York apartment when you can get the entire isle of Manhattan for a fraction of the cost?  

(Microscape)

Plastic city tiles, $65 to $275 pre-order at Kickstarter.  

H/t Curbed

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