Kikkerland

That also doubles as a concrete planter.

Admittedly, there’s not much that feels heroic about desktop drudgery. But this concrete lamp/planter combo could at least add a bit of architectural interest to your toils.

The small lamp, which will be available this spring via Kikkerland, is powered by a USB cable. A fabric-wrapped cord is included; plug it into your laptop to shed a little light on your to-do list or reading material.

Kikkerland

The base doubles as a sleek container for potted plants. Try ones with shallow roots, such as succulents, like the echeveria above. (Toss in a few pebbles to help with drainage and prevent the roots from rotting.)

The lamp is slim enough to keep on your desk without cutting into your work space. When business is dull, you can glance at it and ask yourself, “What would Marcel Breuer do?”

Lamp, $30 at Kikkerland.

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