Fishs Eddy

Printed on a plate, this apartment will only run you $9.95.

New York City studios are notoriously pricey, but now there’s a way to buy one for less than ten dollars. Thanks to the homegoods shop Fishs Eddy, urbanophiles can order specially-designed dinner plates printed with a generic New York studio floor plan.

According to the site’s web manager, Katherine Yaksich, the product was intended for “anyone who has ever had to deal with Manhattan real estate.” While the floor plan itself may seem simple, the apartment would likely cost around $2,350 a month in real life.

The corresponding mug, below, features a more elaborate floor plan for a penthouse. Complete with a library and drawing room, a similar property in New York City would likely sell for over $6 million. While these plates and mugs are certainly no substitute for their real-life inspirations, they are nevertheless a fun addition to your (probably less-expensive) home.

Dinner plate, $9.95 and mug, $13.95 at Fishs Eddy.

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