Vivero.fl

In a world of open-office distractions, Tomoko aims to provide a weirdly oversized refuge.

If you’ve ever worked in an office, you know the feeling. Some days you just need to hunker down in a corner somewhere to get away. Maybe you’re having trouble concentrating, or you’re crashing on a deadline, or you took the company happy hour a little too seriously last night.

Maybe you’re sitting at your desk right now nodding, thinking to yourself, Yeah, but this open office doesn’t have anywhere to hide from the glaring lights and unending gaze of everyone around me. And maybe your coworker just asked you why you’re nodding so aggressively.

So here’s some good news! If you need to hide your face for a little while, the Tomoko can help. Brought into this distractible world by Finnish design firm MottoWasabi and sold by the contemporary furniture store Vivero, the Tomoko is a huge felt dome that serves as a “sheltering, acoustic piece of office furniture for privacy and concentration,” according to its website. It also has the added benefit of showing the world what it might look like if Sia took a desk job.

Just stick your head inside and be delighted by all the peaceful darkness and slightly muted sounds you need to finally get some work done. Now that’s what productivity looks like, you’ll think. Don’t worry, your colleagues are definitely not looking at you anymore.

It’s meant to have a meditative quality to it, according to Vivero:

[It] helps you to create an immediate territory of your own by eliminating elements that interfere with your concentration, such as noise or visual distractions. ... At the same time, it signals to others that you are not to be disturbed.

If you’re really feeling that head-in-the-sand vibe, why not pair it with an Ostrich Pillow to show the world that right here, right now, you really just can’t.

Felt dome, price upon request at Vivero.

H/t: Fast Co. Exist

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