Akihiro Yoshida

For the aesthetics nerd in the cubicle next door.

Sticky notes are eminently helpful, but they’re not quite...cool. What could be less chic than a fluorescent sticky filled with annoying trivialities?

Japanese design studio Nendo to the rescue. Its soon-to-be-released stationary set includes a very architectural square of notes called “block memo,” which only comes in sleek, minimalist white.

(Akihiro Yoshida)

Each block contains three sizes of sticky notes, which the studio envisions being used as memos, bookmarks, and large and glaring reminders of sundry minutiae.

Together, the differently sized notes form a cube with a missing corner, so “block memo” can rest comfortably on your desk. Happy posting.

(Akihiro Yoshida)

H/t Co.Design

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