Courtesy of Easy, Tiger

A corkboard guide to the U.S.A.

When confronted with a map on a wall, it’s hard to resist sticking a tack through the site of your hometown and proclaiming: “That’s where I’m from!”

There’s no need to hold back with the USA Corkboard from Easy, Tiger. Public displays of local pride are its reason for being.

“We’ve seen couples use it at weddings to mark where they’re planning on going, or where all of their guests are from,” the Easy, Tiger cofounder Mike Sayre tells CityLab. “Maps are a universal specific.”

This map in particular also happens to be aesthetically pleasing enough to double as wall décor.

A photo posted by Easy, Tiger (@easytigerco) on

Hand-drawn over an 18-by-24-inch corkboard, the map can be used “to plot out your upcoming adventures, or just remember what city you actually live in,” according to the website.

The pushpin-dotted map is a common site in hostels; people like to show how far from home they’ve traveled. But hanging on an apartment wall, the corkboard map could possibly be the solution to the inevitable awkward silence that descends when guests first gather in your living room.

“It’s a more interactive way for people to relate to each other,” Sayles says. “Who doesn’t like to talk about travel?”

Corkboard, $50 from Easy, Tiger.

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