Andrew Lynch

New York may never stop arguing over how to make the perfect subway map, but one man’s pursuit has at least made for some beautiful designs.

Andrew Lynch, a CUNY Hunter alum with a degree in geography, was originally interested in mapping out possible expansions to New York City’s MTA system while creating something geographically accurate. But after making such maps, Lynch tells CityLab, “I found that the shapes of the lines began to interest me by themselves.”

(Andrew Lynch)

A truly complete subway map, he explains, “would be cluttered and difficult to read.” So instead, Lynch now has a series of posters that isolate each line.

His project, NYC Subway Infographic Posters, shows individual subway lines as well as the story behind them, plus their ridership data—all while staying true to the color scheme and typography used by the MTA.

(Andrew Lynch)

“Totally accurate, totally useless,” Lynch explains on his site, “but damn does it look good.

He plans on adding other cities’ subway systems to the series later this year.

Posters, $25 each.

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