Customize the Eiffel Tower, St. Basil's Cathedral, a Romanian castle, and much more.  

The Favela Santa Maria in Rio de Janeiro—minus the color, of course. (McDonald)

Are we sick of adult coloring books yet? In December, the New York Post reported they were the “hottest trend in publishing,” responsible for nine of Amazon’s top 20 books. (As of writing, it’s been whittled down to one.) When it comes to coloring, the bar is pretty darn high—so get a load of Fantastic Structures, the dazzling new coloring book from the Canadian artist Steven McDonald.

The book is the second in a trilogy. Last year’s Fantastic Cities got the Internet’s urban enthusiasts more than a little excited, and Fantastic Collections—which will feature intimately detailed objectsis set to do the same this coming August. But Structures, out this month, specifically tackles the world’s most distinctive architecture. This is no casual design jaunt: the book takes advanced scribblers to six continents, from an Indian palace to the Ponte Vecchio to Rio’s Santa Maria favela to St. Basil's Cathedral.

The Ponte Vecchio in Florence, Italy. (McDonald)

If coloring intricately rendered patterns is more of your thing, the 60-page book also includes a number of black-and-white mandalas, which await your pencils.

A residential high-rise in Hong Kong. (McDonald)

McDonald told Curbed he’s hoping casual drawers will come away having learned something about design. “I'm trying in these first two books to give you this visual accompaniment to a general course on architecture,” he said. “You got these cities, you got these dwellings, you got these aerial views, you got these buildings, structures, and bridges.”

A close-up view of the Eiffel Tower. (McDonald)

The Internet has also joined in on the fun. Search the #fantasticstructures hashtag on Instagram, and watch the the drawings come to technicolor life.

A photo posted by Anna (@anulaat) on

Fantastic Structures, $14.95 at Chronicle Books.

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