And proud of it. He Said/She Said

“World’s best entry-level employee.”

Toiling away at an office desk has a lot of drawbacks: cold, stale coffee from the communal pot; backaches and twitchy eyes from squinting so long at your computer. But! You might get a placard with your name on it—a little thing to plant among your standard-issue supplies as if to say, this grunt work may be chipping away at my vital life force and will to live, but I am a person, dammit, and this is my seat!

In case your place of employment doesn’t nod to your fundamental humanity, you can perch a little passive-aggressive placard on your desk to herald to your co-workers just how much you resent them, your job, and all your life’s choices.

(He Said/She Said)

The snarky placards from He Said/She Said are equal parts angsty and encouraging. Some, emblazoned with phrases such as “ask me about my cats,” are sure to alienate chatty co-workers who might hold you back from reaching your full potential for wallowing. Others, like the contemplative “what would Beyonce do?” shove you towards greatness.

(He Said/She Said)

You might still be a cog in the wheel, but at least you’re a cog with a sense of humor.  

Name plates, $28 at He Said, She Said.

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