Design Ideas, Ltd.

These throwback ID cases and folio pouches will help you swoop through security.

Long before airports relied on digital technology to transport luggage around the world, graphic design was the easiest way to signal where a bag needed to go. Unlike today’s drab pieces of paper, the luggage tags of years past were colorful and vibrant—in addition to serving their more practical purpose.

(Design Ideas, Ltd.)

The home goods retailer Design Ideas recently turned to these tags for inspiration when designing a new collection of organization-minded travel accessories. The collection’s ID holders feature bold graphics corresponding to three major airports—London (LHR), Paris (CDG), and New York (JFK)—and call to mind a time when flying was as glamorous as it was efficient.

The design pairs the functionality of an ID holder thin enough to fit in your pocket or purse with the visual appeal of vintage luggage tags—“a throwback to this era in which clean, bold design served more than just an aesthetic purpose,” the brand’s website proclaims.

Drawing upon the same concept, the collection also includes a set of folio pouches (below) that can store everything from makeup to small electronics.

Design Ideas, Ltd.

ID case and pouches, $7-$9 each at Design Ideas.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A sign outside a storefront in Buffalo, New York.
    Environment

    Will Buffalo Become a Climate Change Haven?

    The Western New York city possesses a distinct mix of weather, geography, and infrastructure that could make it a potential climate haven. But for whom?

  2. photo: a high-speed train in Switzerland
    Transportation

    The Case for Portland-to-Vancouver High-Speed Rail

    At the Cascadia Rail Summit outside Seattle, a fledgling scheme to bring high-speed rail from Portland to Vancouver found an enthusiastic reception.

  3. photo: A vacant home in Oakland that is about to demolished for an apartment complex.
    Equity

    Fix California's Housing Crisis, Activists Say. But Which One?

    As a controversy over unoccupied homes in the Bay Area and Los Angeles reveals, advocates disagree about what kind of housing should be built, and where.

  4. Environment

    The City Known for ‘Sewer Socialists’ Actually Has Great Sewers

    Milwaukee now averages a mere 2.4 combined sewer overflows a year, thanks to a massive underground tunnel, green infrastructure, and flood-control measures.

  5. A syringe sits on top of a car. Houses are behind it.
    Life

    The Changing Geography of the Opioid Crisis

    A new study shows that the country faces different opioid challenges in urban and rural areas.

×