Design Ideas, Ltd.

These throwback ID cases and folio pouches will help you swoop through security.

Long before airports relied on digital technology to transport luggage around the world, graphic design was the easiest way to signal where a bag needed to go. Unlike today’s drab pieces of paper, the luggage tags of years past were colorful and vibrant—in addition to serving their more practical purpose.

(Design Ideas, Ltd.)

The home goods retailer Design Ideas recently turned to these tags for inspiration when designing a new collection of organization-minded travel accessories. The collection’s ID holders feature bold graphics corresponding to three major airports—London (LHR), Paris (CDG), and New York (JFK)—and call to mind a time when flying was as glamorous as it was efficient.

The design pairs the functionality of an ID holder thin enough to fit in your pocket or purse with the visual appeal of vintage luggage tags—“a throwback to this era in which clean, bold design served more than just an aesthetic purpose,” the brand’s website proclaims.

Drawing upon the same concept, the collection also includes a set of folio pouches (below) that can store everything from makeup to small electronics.

Design Ideas, Ltd.

ID case and pouches, $7-$9 each at Design Ideas.

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