memobottle/A'Design Award

It fits easily in a laptop bag or pants pocket.

Jamming a water bottle into a crowded bag can take significant Tetris skills and result in the illusion that you’re smuggling a large salami. One possible solution: the memobottle, a reusable water flask that holds many refreshing gulps yet is only 1.4 inches thick.

The transparent canteen was invented by Australia’s Jesse Leeworthy and Jonathan Byrt, who got the first model to market last summer after a successful Kickstarter campaign. That rather-large container carries a hydration bomb of 25 fluid ounces, but kind of looks like you’re chugging from an oil canister. The duo then produced a 13-ounce version that fits neatly into a small bag, pants pocket, or bag pocket.

The concept behind the squished bottle is twofold: It’s easily transportable, but also stylish enough that people wouldn’t want to toss it in a landfill. The inventors explain the latter idea over at the A’Design Award, where memobottle has won a gold title for Fashion and Travel Accessories:

Single-use bottle consumption has gone bananas in recent years with 50 billion single use bottles purchased each year in the U.S. and 1,500 of them are discarded every second.

Slim water bottles, $22–$25 at memobottle.

memobottle/A’Design Award

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