memobottle/A'Design Award

It fits easily in a laptop bag or pants pocket.

Jamming a water bottle into a crowded bag can take significant Tetris skills and result in the illusion that you’re smuggling a large salami. One possible solution: the memobottle, a reusable water flask that holds many refreshing gulps yet is only 1.4 inches thick.

The transparent canteen was invented by Australia’s Jesse Leeworthy and Jonathan Byrt, who got the first model to market last summer after a successful Kickstarter campaign. That rather-large container carries a hydration bomb of 25 fluid ounces, but kind of looks like you’re chugging from an oil canister. The duo then produced a 13-ounce version that fits neatly into a small bag, pants pocket, or bag pocket.

The concept behind the squished bottle is twofold: It’s easily transportable, but also stylish enough that people wouldn’t want to toss it in a landfill. The inventors explain the latter idea over at the A’Design Award, where memobottle has won a gold title for Fashion and Travel Accessories:

Single-use bottle consumption has gone bananas in recent years with 50 billion single use bottles purchased each year in the U.S. and 1,500 of them are discarded every second.

Slim water bottles, $22–$25 at memobottle.

memobottle/A’Design Award

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: subway in NYC
    Transportation

    Inside Bloomberg's $1 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

    Drawing on his time as New York City mayor, Michael Bloomberg proposes handing power and money to urban leaders as part of his Democratic presidential bid.

  2. Environment

    Housing Discrimination Made Summers Even Hotter

    The practice of redlining in the 1930s helps explain why poorer U.S. neighborhoods experience more extreme heat.

  3. Transportation

    In Paris, a Very Progressive Agenda Is Going Mainstream

    Boosted by big sustainability wins, Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pitching bold plans to make the city center “100 percent bicycle” and turn office space into housing.

  4. photo: a couple tries out a mattress in a store.
    Equity

    What’s the Future of the ‘Sleep Economy’?

    As bed-in-a-box startup Casper files for an IPO, the buzzy mattress seller is betting that the next big thing in sleep is brick-and-mortar retail outlets.

  5. Children walk in single file between military-style tents.
    Design

    Should Designers Try to Reform Immigrant Detention?

    Some architects believe it’s their duty to try to improve conditions for immigrant detainees in the U.S., while others urge a total boycott of such work.

×