Our newest destination, in partnership with Univision Digital.

We’re thrilled to introduce CityLab readers to our newest sister site, CityLab Latino.

What’s CityLab Latino? It’s a Spanish-language version of the English-language CityLab you’ve already come to know (and, hopefully, love). It’s also the result of our new partnership with Univision Digital. You can find the site, which is also accessible at Univision.com, at www.citylablatino.com.

We’re launching the new site today with a mix of translated versions of some of the best CityLab.com stories from the recent past as well as original pieces, including a close-up look at how activists in Brownsville, Texas, are fighting obesity with bikes, and a report on the real causes of pollution in Mexico City.

We created CityLab Latino with a single aim: to broaden our coverage of the most important ideas and pressing issues facing today’s cities and neighborhoods, with an emphasis on the Spanish-speaking world. We’ll focus especially on topics such as affordable housing and transportation, crime, immigration, rising sea levels, architecture, and urban design in the global cities where Spanish is spoken.

But CityLab Latino will also cover cities and topics from the U.S. and all over the world, just like CityLab.com does. That’s because even as the world’s urban population continues to explode, cities everywhere increasingly have more in common than not. They learn from each other, they challenge each other, and they share so many of the same goals: to grow responsibly, to thrive sustainably, and to secure a safe and lasting future for the generations that follow.

Like all digital publications these days, CityLab Latino is still a work in progress, and we welcome your feedback over the coming weeks, months, and years. Questions? Want to contribute? E-mail Juan Pablo Garnham at jgarnham@univision.net.

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