In "The Bookmobile," a StoryCorps project, a young Native American girl shares a tale of discovery.

At 8 years old, Storm Reyes was already working full time in the fields outside Tacoma, Washington. Most of the migrant workers were, like Reyes, Native Americans, and worked for less than $1 per hour in berry patches and apple orchards. She was never allowed to own books because their heaviness would be an obstacle to moving frequently. In this StoryCorps animated short, Reyes tells the story of how a bookmobile changed her life. “By the time I was 15, I knew there was a world outside of the camps. I believed I could find a place in it,” she says. “I had seen how huge the world was, and it gave me the courage to leave.”

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A young girl winces from the sting as she receives the polio vaccine in 1954.
    Life

    How Mandatory Vaccination Fueled the Anti-Vaxxer Movement

    To better understand the controversy over New York’s measles outbreak, you have to go back to the late 19th century.

  2. A new map of neighborhood change in U.S. metros shows where displacement is the main problem, and where economic decline persists.
    Equity

    From Gentrification to Decline: How Neighborhoods Really Change

    A new report and accompanying map finds extreme gentrification in a few cities, but the dominant trend—particularly in the suburbs—is the concentration of low-income population.

  3. Electricians install solar panels on a roof for Arizona Public Service company in Goodyear, Arizona.
    Environment

    A Bottom-Line Case for the Green New Deal: The Jobs Pay More

    A Brookings report finds that jobs in the clean energy, efficiency, and environmental sectors offer higher salaries than the U.S. average.

  4. Equity

    Is This the Next Mayor of Boston?

    City Councilor Michelle Wu, a Chicago native, has pushed for fare-free transit, tangled with Airbnb over housing regulations, and shaken up the politics of Old Boston.  

  5. A photo of shoppers on University Avenue in East Palo Alto, California, which is flanked by two technology campuses.
    Equity

    An Island of Silicon Valley Affordability Says Yes to More Housing

    East Palo Alto is surrounded by tech riches, but that hasn’t necessarily helped longtime residents, who welcome a state law mandating zoning reform