In "The Bookmobile," a StoryCorps project, a young Native American girl shares a tale of discovery.

At 8 years old, Storm Reyes was already working full time in the fields outside Tacoma, Washington. Most of the migrant workers were, like Reyes, Native Americans, and worked for less than $1 per hour in berry patches and apple orchards. She was never allowed to own books because their heaviness would be an obstacle to moving frequently. In this StoryCorps animated short, Reyes tells the story of how a bookmobile changed her life. “By the time I was 15, I knew there was a world outside of the camps. I believed I could find a place in it,” she says. “I had seen how huge the world was, and it gave me the courage to leave.”

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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