Lumineer

The bright Lumineer can’t be stolen without a thief taking apart your ride.

You can burn through a couple hundred dollars’ worth of fancy bike lights a year just by leaving them unsecured on your ride. London-based designer Anirudha Surabhi Venkata is attempting to solve this problem with the Lumineer, a device that’s built into the handlebars like a single, swell-looking car headlight.

The 300-lumen contraption is a “bike light no one one will notice, until it matters,” Venkata writes on Kickstarter, where it just met its funding goal. “It seamlessly blends into your bike’s sleek, sturdy frame.” The light is not just hard to snatch, requiring a thief to take apart the bike’s front end, but has a rugged, water- and crash-resistant aluminum composition.

It also provides a nice survival boost for your dying phone, Venkata writes:

Lumineer also has your back in case you need an emergency phone charge. Plug it right into the micro usb port underneath the stem and you'll have 3.6V-2500mAh of battery power to keep your lifeline alive.

The light uses a rechargable battery that drops out of the unit, so you don’t have to dissect the bike every time you need more juice. And in case you’re worried about blinding other people like an incoming jetliner, it has a special acrylic lens that directs the beam safely toward the ground.

Lumineer, £50 or $73 early-backer price on Kickstarter.

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