Lumineer

The bright Lumineer can’t be stolen without a thief taking apart your ride.

You can burn through a couple hundred dollars’ worth of fancy bike lights a year just by leaving them unsecured on your ride. London-based designer Anirudha Surabhi Venkata is attempting to solve this problem with the Lumineer, a device that’s built into the handlebars like a single, swell-looking car headlight.

The 300-lumen contraption is a “bike light no one one will notice, until it matters,” Venkata writes on Kickstarter, where it just met its funding goal. “It seamlessly blends into your bike’s sleek, sturdy frame.” The light is not just hard to snatch, requiring a thief to take apart the bike’s front end, but has a rugged, water- and crash-resistant aluminum composition.

It also provides a nice survival boost for your dying phone, Venkata writes:

Lumineer also has your back in case you need an emergency phone charge. Plug it right into the micro usb port underneath the stem and you'll have 3.6V-2500mAh of battery power to keep your lifeline alive.

The light uses a rechargable battery that drops out of the unit, so you don’t have to dissect the bike every time you need more juice. And in case you’re worried about blinding other people like an incoming jetliner, it has a special acrylic lens that directs the beam safely toward the ground.

Lumineer, £50 or $73 early-backer price on Kickstarter.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of the First Pasadena State Bank building, designed by Texas modernist architects MacKie and Kamrath. It will be demolished on July 21.
    Design

    The Lonely Death of a South Texas Skyscraper

    The First Pasadena State Bank, a 12-story modernist tower inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright, has dominated this small town near Houston since 1962.

  2. The legs of a crash-test dummy.
    Transportation

    A Clue to the Reason for Women’s Pervasive Car-Safety Problem

    Crash-test dummies are typically models of an average man. Women are 73 percent more likely to be injured in a car accident. These things are probably connected.

  3. A photo of anti-gentrification graffiti in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    The Hidden Winners in Neighborhood Gentrification

    A new study claims the effects of neighborhood change on original lower-income residents are largely positive, despite fears of spiking rents and displacement.

  4. A NASA rendering of a moon base with lunar rover from 1986.
    Life

    We Were Promised Moon Cities

    It’s been 50 years since Apollo 11 put humans on the surface of the moon. Why didn’t we stay and build a more permanent lunar base? Lots of reasons.

  5. A crowded street outside in Boston
    Life

    Surveillance Cameras Debunk the Bystander Effect

    A new study uses camera footage to track the frequency of bystander intervention in heated incidents in Amsterdam; Cape Town; and Lancaster, England.                            

×