Blue Crow Media

Let this guide steer you past office buildings, theaters, Tube stations, and more.

Art Deco buildings are widely viewed today as attractive, historic, and worth saving. Thirty-five years ago, they were one preservation society’s hardest battle. 

The Twentieth Century Society formed in 1979 with the intention of preserving London’s best buildings constructed after 1914—after the cutoff year for inclusion in the city’s Victorian Society. 

If London’s traditional preservationists look to old Euston Station as a martyr, then the Firestone Factory in Brentford may be the Twentieth Century Society’s example. Its first preservation call-to-arms, the building was sneakily demolished over a holiday weekend in 1980. The event gave validation to the Society’s cause of preserving the architectural style of the ‘20s and ‘30s that brought flair to the modern age. 

The Hoover Building (Simon Phipps/Blue Crow Media)

According to the group, 150 places built between WWI and WWII in London have since been listed by the government as being of historical or architectural significance. A little over 70—some of which are still unlisted—have been rounded up in the new Art Deco London Map.

Designed by Blue Crow Media in cooperation with the Twentieth Century Society, the map includes theaters, office buildings, factories, and nearly two dozen underground stations. A summary of Art Deco features and history is included on the back, as well as a list of each building’s architect and opening year.

This is the second installment of the series, after last year’s Brutalist London Map. Blue Crow Media plans on branching out to other cities later this year, starting with Moscow. 

Map, £8 ($11.65) at Blue Crow Media.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A view of traffic near Los Angeles.
    Transportation

    How Cars Divide America

    Car dependence not only reduces our quality of life, it’s a crucial factor in America’s economic and political divisions.

  2. Equity

    Bike Advocacy’s Blind Spot

    The biking community is overwhelmingly concerned with infrastructure. For urban anthropologist Adonia Lugo, that’s an equity problem.

  3. Transportation

    Hartford Trains Its Hopes for Renewal on Commuter Rail

    Connecticut’s new Hartford Line isn’t just a train: It’s supposed to be an engine for the capital city’s post-industrial transformation.

  4. A child plays in a city-sanctioned encampment for homeless families in San Diego.
    Equity

    A Family Dispute: Who Counts As Homeless?

    A bill designed to expand HUD’s recognition of homelessness reveals a split between advocates on who counts as the most vulnerable population.

  5. Life

    Never (Baby) Trump

    How do you make light of something that isn’t funny anymore?