Blue Crow Media

Let this guide steer you past office buildings, theaters, Tube stations, and more.

Art Deco buildings are widely viewed today as attractive, historic, and worth saving. Thirty-five years ago, they were one preservation society’s hardest battle. 

The Twentieth Century Society formed in 1979 with the intention of preserving London’s best buildings constructed after 1914—after the cutoff year for inclusion in the city’s Victorian Society. 

If London’s traditional preservationists look to old Euston Station as a martyr, then the Firestone Factory in Brentford may be the Twentieth Century Society’s example. Its first preservation call-to-arms, the building was sneakily demolished over a holiday weekend in 1980. The event gave validation to the Society’s cause of preserving the architectural style of the ‘20s and ‘30s that brought flair to the modern age. 

The Hoover Building (Simon Phipps/Blue Crow Media)

According to the group, 150 places built between WWI and WWII in London have since been listed by the government as being of historical or architectural significance. A little over 70—some of which are still unlisted—have been rounded up in the new Art Deco London Map.

Designed by Blue Crow Media in cooperation with the Twentieth Century Society, the map includes theaters, office buildings, factories, and nearly two dozen underground stations. A summary of Art Deco features and history is included on the back, as well as a list of each building’s architect and opening year.

This is the second installment of the series, after last year’s Brutalist London Map. Blue Crow Media plans on branching out to other cities later this year, starting with Moscow. 

Map, £8 ($11.65) at Blue Crow Media.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A pupil works on a cardboard architectural model at a Hong Kong primary school.
    Design

    The Case for Architecture Classes in Schools

    Through the organization Architecture for Children, Hong Kong architect Vicky Chan has taught urban design and planning to thousands of kids. Here’s why.

  2. A photo of shoppers in the central textile market of downtown Jakarta.
    Design

    How Cities Design Themselves

    Urban planner Alain Bertaud’s new book, Order Without Design, argues that cities are really shaped by market forces, not visionaries.

  3. The Metropolitan Opera House in New York
    Equity

    How Urban Core Amenities Drive Gentrification and Increase Inequality

    A new study finds that as the rich move back to superstar cities' urban cores to gain access to unique amenities they drive low-income people out.

  4. A photo of a bicycle in a bike lane.
    Transportation

    The Life-Saving ‘Dutch Reach’ Comes to American Driver’s Ed

    Starting in January, American traffic safety organizations like AAA will teach motorists how to better avoid hitting passing bicyclists with car doors.

  5. A photo of a man sitting on a bench in East Baltimore.
    Equity

    Why Is It Legal for Landlords to Refuse Section 8 Renters?

    San Jose and Baltimore are considering bills to prevent landlords from rejecting tenants based on whether they are receiving federal housing aid. Why is that necessary?