Dot to Dot NYC by Narae Kim, published by powerHouse Books.

Paint the town red—or any other color you want.

There’s great way to step away, if only for a couple of hours, from all the chaos and stress in our lives into a world where we draw the lines, where everything is just black and white—or really, any other color we want it to be.

I’m talking about coloring books, of course, which have really caught the fancy of adults around the world.  Some of my own colleagues vouch for the restorative powers of this popular children’s activity, and science backs up their experiences.

Here at CityLab, we’ve featured a couple of adult coloring books that cater specifically to urbanists and cartography nerds. Now there’s a new one, called Dot to Dot NYC, to add to the collection.

The book, which comes out in August, is the creation of the Seoul-based artist Nara Kim. She visited New York City in 2012 and was smitten. The press release beckons New York lovers to arm themselves with drawing supplies and turn abstract clusters of dots into the city’s iconic skyline:

Follow the numbers, grab your crayons and markers, and discover and decorate the capital of the world... Hidden just beyond sight in this adventurous dot to dot coloring book lie epic New York City landmarks to be revealed and completed by you, the intrepid artist.

For inspiration, check out these pop-art versions of Coney Island, the Brooklyn Bridge, Times Square, and Central Park in the book:

Dot to Dot NYC by Narae Kim, published by powerHouse Books.
Dot to Dot NYC by Narae Kim, published by powerHouse Books

Dot to Dot NYC by Narae Kim, published by powerHouse Books.
Dot to Dot NYC by Narae Kim, published by powerHouse Books.

Dot to Dot NYC, $14.95 on Amazon.

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