A new video documents a solar initiative that aims to relieve economic pressures on low-income families. 

One in five American households has sacrificed spending to afford rent, scrimping on food, clothes, other necessary expenses in order to make ends meet. Low-income families with high energy costs often face tough decisions about how to pay for electricity, too. As Julian Spector recently reported for CityLab, GRID Alternatives installs residential solar panels at no cost, and offers job training programs in the sustainable energy sector. 

Our colleagues at AtlanticLIVE recently documented the organization’s work around D.C. and screened this video at a policy forum.

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