Meet the women who are making it happen.

There’s an enormous potential for solar energy in sun-soaked California, which already employs nearly three-times as many people in clean energy than work in the film and television industries. But what does the growth of the solar industry look like at the local level? Skilled solar job opportunities are only expected to expand—will the communities that need those jobs the most be ready for them?

Season 2 of Van Alen Sessions, presented by Van Alen Institute with The Atlantic and CityLab, kicks off with a visit to a unique solar installation training site on a rooftop in Los Angeles’s Watts neighborhood. You’ll meet the women participating in the program and learn how they’re bringing power to the people, and empowering themselves.

About This Series: Van Alen Sessions is presented by Van Alen Institute with The Atlantic and CityLab. Season Two, “Power Lines,” is directed and produced by Kelly Loudenberg. The series is made possible with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, and is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Connect with Van Alen Institute on vanalen.org.

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