Now that the game has finally launched in Pokemon’s birth country, the Japanese government is prepared for the worst.

Pokemon Go has swiftly taken over the U.S. and Europe, prompting tenacious trainers everywhere to wander into the farthest corners of their cities to (virtually) catch them all. Now, after weeks of anticipation, the mobile game has finally arrived in Japan—the very country that gave us these irresistibly kawaii monsters—and the Pokemon craze is expected to be even bigger.

By now, news of Pokemon Go players falling off cliffs, getting robbed, and crashing into police cars has reached the other side of the world, and Japan knows its own citizens are not immune to these kinds of mishaps. In fact, the BBC writes that just hours after the game launched, a student at Osaka's Kindai University reportedly fell down the stairs while playing and had to be taken to the hospital.

That’s why the country—maker of tourist etiquette manuals and life-saving driver decals—is prepared for the worst-case scenarios. The government-run National Center of Incident Readiness and Strategy for Cybersecurity issued on Friday a guide with nine safety tips, with warnings about everything from fake apps to heat strokes to gun-toting cowboys overseas.

(Japan's National Center of Incident Readiness and Strategy for Cybersecurity via AP)

The flyer is fairly text heavy, but cute characters guide potential users through some of the most important safety precautions. Some are common sense. Number 1, for example, advises users to protect personal information by using a nickname and hiding their immediate location. Numbers 7 and 8 warn users to be cautious of their surroundings—don’t enter dangerous areas, and don’t meet with suspicious strangers.

Others are reminders of things that the typical player might not think about. Download weather apps, Number 3 suggests. You know, in case you’re so absorbed in your quest that you fail to notice a tsunami coming your way, as depicted in the drawing of a person dragging a player from fierce waves. Number 5 warns players to bring extra batteries, as GPS will eat up the phone’s supply.

Perhaps the most obvious but too-often-ignored tip is Number 9: Do not use smartphones while walking. Frankly, (most of) these tips are good reminders for everyone.

H/t Gizmodo

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: Mayor Luigi Brugnaro walks on St Mark's Square as exceptionally high tidal flooding engulfed the city.
    Environment

    Venice Faces ‘Apocalyptic’ Flooding

    Seasonal acqua alta reached the highest level since 1966, leaving two dead and devastating damage. The city’s ambitious flood barrier isn’t ready yet.

  2. photo: A woman crosses an overpass above the 101 freeway in Los Angeles, California.
    Transportation

    Navigation Apps Changed the Politics of Traffic

    In an excerpt from the new book The Future of Transportation, CityLab’s Laura Bliss adds up the “price of anarchy” when it comes to traffic navigation apps.

  3. photo: A metro train at Paris' Gare Du Nord.
    Transportation

    Can the Paris Metro Make Room for More Riders?

    The good news: Transit ridership is booming in the French capital. But severe crowding now has authorities searching for short-term solutions.

  4. A view of a Harlem corner.
    Equity

    How Ronald Reagan Halted the Early Anti-Gentrification Movement

    An excerpt from Newcomers, a new book by Matthew L. Schuerman, documents the early history of the anti-gentrification and back-to-the-city movements.

  5. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

×