Tired of steep electricity bills, one couple stopped power to their home in Washington, D.C., and made a drastic change.

In the heart of Washington, D.C., Keya Chatterjee and her family live off the energy produced from a single solar panel. It started in 2006, when Chatterjee and her husband had a fight with their electrical company. They were so tired of the astronomical bills that they stopped power to their home and spent the entire winter living without heating or electricity—essentially camping in their own home. After a frigid few months, they installed the solar panel and returned to Pepco, but now they supply energy to the grid rather than using it. Today, Chatterjee’s life runs on solar energy, she takes public transportation everywhere, and she’s figured out how to live with as little consumption as possible.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

About the Author

Sam Price-Waldman
Sam Price-Waldman

Sam Price-Waldman is a former senior associate producer for video at The Atlantic.

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