For these Chinese engineers, it's go big or go home.

No one can say China doesn’t go HAM on road projects. Last year it replaced a humongous bridge in less than two days, and this winter rotated two highway overpasses 90 degrees in about 90 minutes.

This latest example of powerhouse construction tactics might take the cake, though. Over the weekend, 116 excavators lined up in two rows and, with an almost balletic coordination, totally dismantled a 1,640-foot bridge in Jiangxi. Reuters reports via CCTV:

The project began at 10:30 p.m. local time [on Friday] with the main structure of the overpass being demolished by the end of the night, state broadcaster CCTV reported. With car ownership on the rise, the 24-year-old two-lane overpass could no longer sustain the amount of traffic travelling on it CCTV added, so local officials decided it was time to tear it down. The overpass also needed to be demolished to help make way for a subway system, CCTV said, without giving further details. The demolition and clearing project was scheduled to be completed within 56 hours, so the area could be reopened to the public on Monday morning.

CCTV’s audio doesn’t start until halfway through its video, so feel free to watch this mashup instead with the appropriate music.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A man walks out of the door frame of a building that collapsed after an earthquake, in the Condesa neighborhood of Mexico City, Tuesday, September 19, 2017.
    Environment

    Mexico City's Earthquake, Through Residents' Eyes

    Here’s how locals responded when shocks struck the city.

  2. A Juggalo standing in front of Buffalo City Hall.
    Equity

    The Juggalo March Is Not a Joke

    Facepainted fans of the Insane Clown Posse are gathering on the National Mall this weekend. And they have something important to say.

  3. Transportation

    The Commuter Parking Benefit Is Seriously Hurting Cities

    The federal government spends $7.6 billion a year paying people to drive to work, and it’s making traffic and pollution worse. Here’s how some cities are fighting back.

  4. POV

    How to Save a Dying Suburb

    For older, inner-ring suburbs in the Northeast and Midwest, the best hope often lies in merging with the city.

  5. Transportation

    Portland Prepares for the Freeway Fight of the Century

    A grass-capped highway expansion in a gentrifying neighborhood? Sounds familiar.