Welcome to the battlefield. Rachel Zack/Flickr

Help!

The folks at Apartment Therapy recently compiled a list of apps to calm potential roommate squabbles over things like managing bills and collating grocery lists. It does seem like Splitwise would be a useful ledger, keeping digital tabs on who owes what. And OurGroceries could stop the thing where everyone remembers—all at once—that there’s no more tomato sauce, and then there are suddenly five jars in the fridge.

But when it comes to soothing the roommate shenanigans that chafe us, the apps on the market don’t go quite far enough. Here are some more salves we’re holding out for:

Dishtagram

Share incriminating photos of the pots and pans your roommates left to “soak” before skulking off.

Shazam for Who Did This?

Someone knew that the cat puked there, and just nudged the rug over a little to cover the crusting puddle.

Not Today! Not Today! Still Not!

This app reminds you when it’s time to pay rent. (It’s like a calendar, but more cheerful, and then sadder.)

Turn That Down

Remote in to your roommate’s laptop and lower the volume when you’re trying to sleep or study.

Find My Cheese

Your gouda used to be in the fridge. Now it’s nowhere to be found.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: Police line up outside the White House in Washington, D.C. as protests against the killing of George Floyd continue.
    Perspective

    America’s Cities Were Designed to Oppress

    Architects and planners have an obligation to protect health, safety and welfare through the spaces we design. As the George Floyd protests reveal, we’ve failed.

  2. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  3. Equity

    What Happened to Crime in Camden?

    Often ranked as one of the deadliest cities in America, Camden, New Jersey, ended 2017 with its lowest homicide rate since the 1980s.

  4. Four New York City police officers arresting a man.
    Equity

    The Price of Defunding the Police

    A new report fleshes out the controversial demand to cut police department budgets and reallocate those funds into healthcare, housing, jobs, and schools. Will that make communities of color safer?

  5. Equity

    The Problem With Research on Racial Bias and Police Shootings

    Despite new research on police brutality, we still have no idea whether violence toward African Americans is fueled by racial prejudice. That has consequences.

×