Welcome to the battlefield. Rachel Zack/Flickr

Help!

The folks at Apartment Therapy recently compiled a list of apps to calm potential roommate squabbles over things like managing bills and collating grocery lists. It does seem like Splitwise would be a useful ledger, keeping digital tabs on who owes what. And OurGroceries could stop the thing where everyone remembers—all at once—that there’s no more tomato sauce, and then there are suddenly five jars in the fridge.

But when it comes to soothing the roommate shenanigans that chafe us, the apps on the market don’t go quite far enough. Here are some more salves we’re holding out for:

Dishtagram

Share incriminating photos of the pots and pans your roommates left to “soak” before skulking off.

Shazam for Who Did This?

Someone knew that the cat puked there, and just nudged the rug over a little to cover the crusting puddle.

Not Today! Not Today! Still Not!

This app reminds you when it’s time to pay rent. (It’s like a calendar, but more cheerful, and then sadder.)

Turn That Down

Remote in to your roommate’s laptop and lower the volume when you’re trying to sleep or study.

Find My Cheese

Your gouda used to be in the fridge. Now it’s nowhere to be found.

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