Blue Crow Media

A new map marks a path through the Russian capital in pursuit of Soviet avant-garde architecture.

The Shukhov tower in Moscow is still standing today, just barely. In early 2014, the Russian State Committee for Television and Radio Broadcasting agreed to dismantle the Constructivist broadcast tower only to see Moscow City Hall officially protect it later that summer after widespread opposition to its demolition.

The tower is just one of many structures all over Moscow built during a time of great artistic energy in the young U.S.S.R. Many of them can now be spotted easily on a new map.

From left to right: Shukhov Tower, NKPS Building, Gosplan Garage. (Natalia Melikova)

Constructivist Moscow Map, released earlier this month, includes 50 structures that defined the ambitions of Soviet Russia in the years following the Russian Revolution. Traditional ornament was rejected in favor of geometry and new materials to express a revolutionary way of living from residential towers to factories. “For the first time,” writes the preservation activist Natalia Melikova in the map’s introduction, “innovations developed by Russian architects and engineers began to influence architecture abroad.”

Melikvoa runs an advocacy group called The Constructivist Project, which collaborated with Blue Crow Media on the architecture map. As these buildings age in a politically and financially constrained post-Soviet Russia, their futures are far from certain. With a copy of Constructivist Moscow Map, you can spot them (and their nearest Metro stations) while they still stand.

Map, £8 at Blue Crow Media.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of the Eiffel Tower with the words "Made for Sharing" projected on it
    Life

    How France Tries to Keep English Out of Public Life

    France has a long history of using official institutions to protect the French language from outside influence. Still, English keeps working its way in.

  2. Warren Logan
    Transportation

    A City Planner Makes a Case for Rethinking Public Consultation

    Warren Logan, a Bay Area transportation planner, has new ideas about how to truly engage diverse communities in city planning. Hint: It starts with listening.

  3. Berlin's Friedrichstrasse will test a car ban starting in October 2019.
    Transportation

    Why Berlin’s Approach to Car Bans Is a Little Different

    The German capital will experiment with banning cars on two popular retail streets—but it’s being notably more cautious than its European counterparts.

  4. Transportation

    CityLab University: Induced Demand

    When traffic-clogged highways are expanded, new drivers quickly materialize to fill them. What gives? Here’s how “induced demand” works.

  5. An illustration of a turtle with a city on its shell
    Transportation

    Why Speed Kills Cities

    U.S. cities are dropping urban speed limits in an effort to boost safety and lower crash rates. But the benefits of less-rapid urban mobility don’t end there.  

×