Egloo/Indiegogo

The Egloo is made of terracotta and needs just four tea lights to heat a whole room.

In a matter of weeks, apartment dwellers will be switching off their A/Cs and resuscitating creaky heating systems after months of disuse. But if a whistling steam heater or an overzealous furnace doesn’t sound appealing, there’s another option.

The Egloo is made of terracotta and is roughly hamburger-like in size and appearance. It comes in an array of colors and textures, and using just four small candles, it generates enough heat to warm a 20-square-meter room. On Egloo’s already well-overfunded Indiegogo page, the creator, Marco Zagaria, wrote that he designed the heater to counteract the excess of electricity commonly used to warm domestic spaces.

To do so, Zagaria used a material commonly found in Italian gardens: terracotta. The burnt-orange clay quickly absorbs and retains heat, and gradually releases it into the surrounding environment. Egloo’s top layer contains two terra-cotta domes (below) arranged nesting-doll style. Once the thinner interior dome is warmed by candles resting on a metal grill, the heat flows into the space between the domes, then is emitted through a hole at the top of the Egloo.

(Egloo/Indiegogo)

Zagaria recommends simple tea candles to power the Egloo. Burning them for 30 minutes under the terracotta domes increases the temperature in a room by up to 5 degrees Fahrenehit, and they generally last for up to five hours.

As the blog Homeli pointed out, heating a room with terracotta containers and candles is nothing new: it’s something of a space-heating DIY favorite, as shown in this video. But Egloo is the first such product to reproduce this tactic—and as far as homewares go, it’s much less obtrusive than an upturned flowerpot surrounded by tea lights in the middle of a living room.

(Egloo/Indiegogo)

Egloo, 45-90 at Eglooinfo.it.

H/t Inhabitat

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