Local musicians celebrate the city's character.

The Atlantic’s video series “Saturday Night in America” is about uncovering pockets of nightlife across the nation. This episode takes place in Austin, Texas, and profiles a pedicab driver, the owner of a honky-tonk bar, and members of a band called The Octopus Project. Despite a continuous influx of new people into the city, small bands who play live music have always shaped the culture. “Austin without music would just be a really boring college town,” says resident Sarah Yopp. “Local music here is, I think, the star of the city. Without music, Austin would die off.”

The film was directed by Ben Wu and David Usui of Lost & Found Films.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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