Here’s what to watch this Halloween weekend.

This past week, CityLab’s been rounding up chilling flicks that say something about cities. Queue them up, if you dare.

Assault on Precinct 13

“Street punks were the villains of choice” for many flicks about life in L.A., writes David Dudley.

Let the Right One In

Feargus O’Sullivan writes that the Swedish suburban dream “turned sour” in this 2008 film.

Oldboy

The brutal vengeance in this film is also an attempt to push back against an oppressive class system, writes Mimi Kirk.

Vertigo

The ghosts of the past hang around in San Francisco, says Eillie Anzilotti.

The Stepford Wives

I read the fembot flick as an example of how place can bend people.

It Follows

Brentin Mock looks at this Detroit-based thriller to uncover the relationship between lore and race.

Psycho

The ‘60s horror classic owes a debt to the growing Interstate Highway System, Kriston Capps writes.

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

A hipster vampire reclaims dark and scary streets for women, says Tanvi Misra.

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