Highlights from The Atlantic's annual summit on urban innovation.

The Atlantic, the Aspen Institute, and Bloomberg Philanthropies on Monday and Tuesday are hosting the fourth annual CityLab 2016 summit in Miami. The event brings together more than 500 global city leaders—40 mayors, plus urban theorists, city planners, scholars, architects, and entrepreneurs—for a series of conversations about the challenges and ideas that are shaping the world's cities and metro areas. CityLab.com readers can watch portions of the event live below, and join the conversation on social media using #CityLabMIA and following @Atlantic_LIVE, @AspenInstitute, and @BloombergDotOrg.

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