Oktyabrskaya Station (previous name: Kaluzhskaya) on the Koltsevaya line. Architect: L. M. Polyakov, 1950. Philipp Meuser/DOM Publishers

Hidden Urbanism is a thorough exploration of the 80-year-old transit system and its future.

What did Nikita Khrushchev desire in a station design? How many variations of  that “M” logo exist? Did Misha ever appear on a ticket? The answers to such burning questions (Minimalism! So many! Yes!) and almost anything else you’d want to know about the Moscow Metro can be found in a new book.

Hidden Urbanism: Architecture and Design of the Moscow Metro 1935-2015 is a thorough exploration of the 80-year-old transit system and its future. Filled with historical documents, new photos, and an explanation of what’s to come, the 351-page book is one the best English-language sources for understanding Moscow’s most admired infrastructure.

Text from Sergey Kuzentsov, Moscow’s chief architect, looks at the ideas behind the architecture and planning for Metro’s current wave of expansion, while the architectural historian Alexander Zmeul explores the philosophical differences in previous expansions from premier to premier. (You’ll never confuse a Brezhnev-era station with a Khrushchev one ever again.) A treasure trove of old maps, tickets, and “M’s” courtesy Art Lebedev Studios—responsible for the system’s current logo and map—round out Hidden Urbanism with a bang.

Hidden Urbanism, $129.95 from DOM Publishers.

Design project for Sverdlovskaya Ploshchad Station. (Copyright: Metrogiprotrans)
Variants of depiction of the Moscow metro’s largest interchange on the metro map (1956, 1963, 1986, 2012). / Official map of the lines of the Moscow metro for use in metro coaches, 2015. (DOM Publishers)
Novokuznetskaya Station on the Zamoskvoretskaya line. Architects: I. G. Taranov and N. A. Bykova, 1943. (DOM Publishers)
Glass mosaics at Trubnaya Station on the Lyublinsko-Dmitrovskaya line. Architects: V. Z. Filippov, S. A. Petrosyan, A. V. Ruban, T. A. Silakadze, T. V. Petrova and S. B. Prytkova, 2007. (DOM Publishers)

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