A visual portrait of Saturday night in Dothan, where people flock from across the South to find a cathartic adrenaline rush.

In Dothan, Alabama, people from across the South flock to Stoney Roberts Demolition to seek out a very specific adrenaline rush—the kind that comes from watching cars smash each other to smithereens. “If you've ever been in a red light and somebody’s cut you off, and you've thought in your mind, ‘Boy for five dollars I'd run right over that son of a gun’...that's what people are here for,” says the owner of the demolition derby, Frank Roberts. It’s addictive, he says, and on a Saturday night it’s what people do. “You get to take your frustrations out, on everything,” adds Eric Beard, a driver.

We traveled to Dothan to get a glimpse of the demolition derby lifestyle, and capture exactly what’s so cathartic about this all-American tradition. This is the fourth episode in The Atlantic’s video series “Saturday Night in America,” which uncovers pockets of nightlife across the nation.

This story originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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