“We’re the Rodney Dangerfield of professional sports.”

On a Saturday night in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, it’s the bowling alleys that get the most traction. "Every city has its own signature—for Milwaukee, it's beer and cheese and bowling," says Doug Schmidt, author of They Came to Bowl.

In this film, Wisconsin’s fervent bowlers want you to know that Milwaukee is fun and that bowling is seriously underrated. "The problem with bowling is the stigma it has across the country,” says Gus Yannaras, a Milwaukee resident and competitive bowler. “We get no respect at all, and it bothers me because we're actually the number-one participant sport in the nation.”

This is the sixth episode in The Atlantic’s video series “Saturday Night in America,” which uncovers pockets of nightlife across the nation. It was directed by Katherine Wells and Flora Lichtman.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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