David W Cerny/Reuters

We’re trying something new, and we hope you’ll join us.

Next week, CityLab will pilot its first NYC installment of HappyHourLab, a chance for our readers to meet for an in-person evening of cocktails and conversation. The first iteration took place in Washington, D.C. in December; this time around, we’re coming to Brooklyn! We invite all of you who live in the area to join us. For those of you in other cities, keep an eye out for future events near you.

When: Wednesday, March 1 at 6:00 p.m.

Where: The Bedford (110 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn)

What: A HappyHourLab chat with Geoff Manaugh, BLDGBLOG blogger and author of A Burglar’s Guide to the City.

Jessica Leigh Hester, CityLab's senior associate editor covering urban life, will lead a conversation with Geoff about secret spaces and ways of engaging with the built environment.

Register here. We look forward to seeing you!

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