Dice and game pieces from Settlers of Catan, one of the games on offer at our upcoming HappyHourLab event at The Uncommons
Let's play. Michael Guio/flickr

We’ll be building worlds at a board-game cafe.

For our next HappyHourLab, a chance to meet up with our readers in person, we’re partnering with The Uncommons, New York's best-known board game cafe. Join us for an evening of city-themed games as we challenge you to be the next mayor, real estate tycoon, or star architect.

When: Wednesday, April 12 from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m.

Where: The Uncommons (230 Thompson Street, New York)

What: A HappyHourLab game night. We’ve reserved some seats, but chairs are first-come, first-serve, so please snag your $10 ticket in advance. Register here. We look forward to seeing you!

If you’ve got suggestions for games we should play, let us know in the comments!

For those of you in other cities, keep an eye out for future events near you.

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